Oct 02, 2014

VISIT ELLAINSTITUTE.COM

Esmeralda Santiago Talks About Comadres in Count On Me: Tales of Sisterhoods and Fierce Friendships

Share this:

Comadres, comai, esmeralda santiago

 New Latina is thrilled to be an official stop on the Count on Me: Tales of Sisterhood and Fierce Friendships book tour hosted by Condor Book Tours. Count on Me, by Las Comadres Para Las Americas and edited by Adriana V. Lopez,  features stories from twelve prominent Latina/o authors who reveal how friendships have helped them to overcome difficult moments in their lives. Below is an intimate interview with one of the book’s contributors, Esmeralda Santiago, as provided by Las Comadres.

For your chance to win a copy of Count on Me: Tales of Sisterhood and Fierce Friendships, be the twelfth person to retweet this article at @NewLatina with the hashtag, #CountOnMe.  The winner will be announced on December 12, 2012. 

Las Comadres’ Interview with Esmeralda Santiago

We recently chatted with New York City area writer Esmeralda Santiago, Count on Me author of the essay, Las Comais, about her inspiration and life as a Comadre.  Here are excerpts from the interview:Las Comais, count on me

What do you hope readers will take away from Las Comais?

If a Latina doesn’t have a Comadre in her life, I hope that through my story and through the other stories, that Latinas will feel an urge to seek out and rekindle those types of relationships. It is important to understand that this notion of a Comadre is a big aspect of our culture and it should be preserved, encouraged and expanded. We get a lot out of the relationship on both sides. Having the support of another woman and being able to be supportive to another woman is such a lovely thing about our culture.

What’s it like having a Comadre?

A Comadre is open minded and when they give you advice it’s based on you, not them. That’s a very valuable thing to have in your life. My Comadres know me well and they know how to listen. I think this is one of the things I value most. These are people that I count on, that I trust, and that I call upon. And it doesn’t matter if they areLatinaor not. Most of my Comadres are not Latinas. You get your family when you’re born, but you get to choose your friends. To have a Comadre is somebody that you choose and with whom you may have a different connection than an aunt or a sister. It’s not about the language and it’s not even about the generation. I have many younger Comadres. It’s about the person and the emotional connection. You have friends that you go dancing with or have drinks with, and this might be more social. But with a Comadre, it’s beyond a social connection, it becomes a familial connection. I think that brings it to a higher level than even the most intimate of friendships.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?

My greatest achievement was to graduate from high school. I’m not being funny or ironic. When I was a teenager, the expectation was that I would probably drop out of high school by 15, start having kids, and become a young Puerto Rican girl living on welfare. That was the norm. It wasn’t easy for me to graduate from high school. I entered high school not having been in the U.S. very long. When I graduated high school, it made me really understand and believe that I could do anything I wanted to. You have dreams but you don’t have goals until you have reached one goal that was hard to reach. When I graduated, I realized you don’t just have dreams, you must have steps to reach them. So then I began to set goals for myself. That’s how my life has progressed. Each time I raise the bar a little higher.

What would you be doing if you weren’t a writer?

I used to be a dancer for many years so I might be doing that. However, the one thing I wish I could be is an opera singer. I really admire the voice of opera singers. I love music and especially classical music. And this love of music is something that I’ve passed to my children. Now grown, both of my children are artists and I’m proud of that.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

I’m inspired by art and music. If there are days that I need inspiration, I spend an entire day at a museum or listen to classical music. I also take long walks. Being in nature is a very big part of my life. There’s nothing like feeling the sun on your skin or listening to the ruffle of leaves. Being connected to my environment inspires me. I’m also very inspired by the ancients. I really feel very connected to literature when it was oral, then written down and passed down. The classics are something that we don’t really teach in schools anymore but I’m old enough that I can remember their influence on me growing up. I love the Iliad. I read a portion of it every year. Every 3 or 4 years I read the whole thing. I have several translations and also have it on audio. I’m also a big fan of poetry.

Do you have a favorite quote or motto to live by?

Adelante! Go forward. Whenever I’m feeling down or something has gone differently from what I expected, I tell myself KEEP MOVING FORWARD. You can’t go backwards. You can only go forward. I try not to spend a lot of time regretting the things that didn’t work out but instead constantly trying to make whatever is going to happen next as positive and satisfying as possible.

Why are you proud to be a Latina?

I am proud to be a Latina because I have a full fascinating history in this hemisphere that I would not trade for any other.

Learn more about Esmeralda Santiago at http://www.esmeraldasantiago.com

Information about the book:

Count On Me: Tales of Sisterhoods and Fierce Friendships (Atria Books)
Edited by Adriana V. López

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Atria Books; Original edition (September 4, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1451642016
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451642018

Also available in e-book for Kindle, iTunes & Nook

To order go to http://www.countonmebook.com/
and click on the orange ORDER button on the Left.

Website: http://www.countonmebook.com/

Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book to review from Condor Book Tours. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

 

 

 

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!
Tanisha Love Ramirez

Tanisha Love Ramirez

Tanisha is the Managing Editor at NEW LATINA, and a social commentary and pop-culture writer/blogger from New York City. She studied Sociology and Women's Studies at Bowdoin College, where she developed a strong interest women's issues and community advocacy. Tanisha has written for the Bowdoin Orient and has interned at BUST Magazine and Jezebel.com.

More Articles - Twitter

Related Stories:

Comments

  1. Rachael Torres says:

    What a GREAT interview – the sharing of those wonderful memories we have from our mothers and their comadres. Esmeralda’s words give me power. It is always great to see Latinas, (and Latinos in general) shown in a great light. The anthology ‘Count on Me’ is a perfect gift for your comadre, best friend, sister… Thanks so much for featuring Las Comadres and all the works you post. Gracias!

  2. I loved this interview and reading about how proud Esmerelda is to be a Latina – its refreshing and inspiring! And, I love her favorite quote – Adelante! Great post!

As seen on The Huffington Post, Latina, Glamour, iVillage and many more!
SEO Powered By SEOPressor